Fourteen Impressive Engineers Join the Cockrell School, 2014-15

With research interests in nanomaterials and nanoelectronics, environmental sustainability, biological networks and geomechanics, this year’s incoming faculty members exhibit a wide range of engineering expertise.

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Cockrell School Again Ranked Top 10 by U.S. News & World Report

The Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin is once again ranked in the top 10 in U.S. News & World Report’s 2015 undergraduate program rankings, strengthening the school’s position as one of the nation’s top engineering schools and research destinations.

The Cockrell School retained its 2014 ranking as the No. 10 best engineering school in the country, and several of UT Austin’s engineering programs ranked in the nation’s top 10 for their respective programs, according to the U.S. News & World Report’s annual rankings released on Sept. 9.

The rankings for the Cockrell School’s undergraduate degree programs this year are:

  • Chemical Engineering, No. 6
  • Civil Engineering, No. 6
  • Environmental/Environmental Health Engineering, No. 6
  • Computer Engineering, No. 8
  • Aerospace/Aeronautical/Astronautical Engineering, No. 9
  • Electrical/Electronic/Communications Engineering, No. 10
  • Mechanical Engineering, No. 10
  • Biomedical Engineering, No. 15

The U.S. News & World Report's 2015 ranking is the latest recognition of the Cockrell School, which was recently ranked in the top 10 in several other national and international rankings lists for best engineering schools. The Cockrell School's recent rankings include:

  • No. 2 best engineering school for Hispanic graduate students, HispanicBusiness Magazine
  • No. 5 best engineering school in the world, Academic Rankings of World Universities
  • No. 8 best engineering school in the world, Professional Engineering magazine

Cockrell School Unveils First-of-its Kind 3-D Printing Vending Machine

3-D printing is rooted in the Cockrell School of Engineering’s past, present and future.

One of the first 3-D printing processes (selective laser sintering), which continues to be used in manufacturing today, was invented here three decades ago. A couple of years ago, Texas Engineering students in the Longhorn Startup Program created a fast and cost-effective 3-D camera and demonstrated it for President Barack Obama. And just last week, the Cockrell School launched a cutting-edge 3-D printing vending machine available for free to all students at The University of Texas at Austin.

The Innovation Station, designed and built by mechanical engineering students led by associate professor Carolyn Seepersad, gives students the opportunity to build objects for a variety of purposes through a web-based portal and queue system.

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University Successfully Completes Campaign, Cockrell School Leads Way

The University of Texas at Austin has successfully completed its Campaign for Texas by raising an estimated $3.1 billion over the past eight years. The Cockrell School of Engineering raised over $350 million, the largest amount raised among the university’s colleges, schools and units during the campaign.

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Alumnus Leaves $35M for Scholarships to Texas’ Top Engineering Students

The Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin will receive a $35 million gift to create an endowment aimed at bringing more of Texas’ best and brightest high school students to UT Austin.

It will be the largest gift the university has received for a scholarship endowment and will provide substantial support for 34 Cockrell School students in the first year alone.

The late T.W. “Tom” Whaley received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from UT Austin in 1968 and provided the gift through a bequest. Whaley, who died in 2013, specified that his gift benefit the school’s annual giving program, called Friends of Alec, with the goal of “funding scholarships for Texans of top academic merit in the fields of engineering and science.”

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Engineers Develop New Device to Improve Skin Cancer Detection

Researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin have designed an optical device that may reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies by offering a fast, comprehensive, noninvasive and lower-cost solution to detect melanoma and other skin cancer lesions.

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