The University of Texas at Austin

News Releases

January 2012

Professor Babuska Awarded Prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award from AMS

A professor in The University of Texas at Austin Cockrell School of Engineering has been awarded a highly coveted lifetime achievement award from the American Mathematical Society (AMS).

December 2011

Research Warns Drivers About Most Deadly, Accident-Prone Intersections

The difference between an intersection controlled by flashing lights and one controlled by a stop sign can play a big role in accident prevention, according to a new study by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin.

The presence of flashing lights increases the probability of an accident by more than threefold, and intersections on frontage roads are among the most crash-prone for motorists.

Four Engineering Faculty Receive Excellence Awards

The Cockrell School of Engineering Faculty Excellence Awards will be presented to four distinguished faculty members at a luncheon Dec. 7. The awards recognize exemplary teaching and professional leadership.

Researchers Receive $300,000 Award To Advance Technology With Potential To Predict Heart Attacks

A University of Texas at Austin engineering professor and a cardiologist from UT Medicine San Antonio have received a $300,000 award to develop a new imaging technique with the potential to predict, or even prevent, heart attacks.

Biomedical engineering Professor Thomas E. Milner of the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, and his longstanding collaborator Dr. Marc D. Feldman will serve as investigators for the Houston-based Clayton Foundation for Research and receive its ongoing support.

University of Texas at Austin Honors World-Changing Achievements of Two Faculty Inventors

Event: The first University of Texas at Austin Inventor of the Year Awards, honoring professors John Goodenough and Adam Heller. Their inventions in energy and healthcare have had societal and economic impact throughout the world.

When: 5:30-7 p.m., Dec. 6

Where: Ballroom, AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center, 1900 University Ave., Austin, Texas, 78705

Background: The University of Texas at Austin will honor two faculty members whose inventions have changed the world.

November 2011

Bob Metcalfe Receives Japan’s C&C Prize for Development of Ethernet

Bob Metcalfe, Internet pioneer and now professor of innovation at The University of Texas at Austin's Cockrell School of Engineering, has been recognized with an international award for his contributions to the development of the Internet.

Metcalfe, an icon of entrepreneurial engineering and inventor of today's local-area networking standard, Ethernet, was recognized Nov. 28 in Tokyo with the C&C Prize. The award, established in 1985, is the highest honor given by the NEC C&C Foundation, a nonprofit organization based in Japan and established to foster growth in the electronics industry by supporting research and development and pioneering work related to the integration of computers and communications technologies. The C&C Prize carries with it a cash award of 10 million yen (about $130,000).

Award will Advance Technology with Potential to Predict Heart Attacks

A University of Texas at Austin engineering professor and a cardiologist-inventor from UT Medicine San Antonio who are developing innovative technology with the potential to predict, or even prevent, heart attacks will become investigators for the Houston-based Clayton Foundation for Research.

1 Semester Startup Class to Host "Demo Day" to Showcase 20 Student Startups

Event: 1 Semester Startup Demo Day at The University of Texas at Austin

When: Thursday, Dec. 1, 5-9 p.m., open to the public

Where: Red McCombs End Zone Club, Gate 16, Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium

Background: Twenty undergraduate student startups from The University of Texas at Austin will present five-minute investor pitches to the Austin entrepreneurial community Thursday, Dec. 1. The startups are part of 1 Semester Startup (1SS), a class at the university that supports undergraduates who are starting companies.

Book Takes Readers Behind the Scenes of the Deepwater Horizon Spill and World's Energy Demand

Not one error but a series of miscommunications and mismanagement from all parties at all levels caused the Deepwater Horizon disaster, aggravated by the world's relentless demand for energy, according to a new book released by Tad Patzek, chair of the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, and co-author Joseph A. Tainter, a professor in the Department of Environment and Society at Utah State University.

The book, "Drilling Down: The Gulf Oil Debacle and Our Energy Dilemma," explains the factors leading up to the largest offshore oil spill in U.S. history and uses the spill as a backdrop to explain the energy-complexity spiral that governs modern life.

Bob Metcalfe Interviews Michael Dell, Founder of Dell Inc., on Startups and Innovation

Event: The Cockrell School of Engineering's Technology Entrepreneurship Society (TES) presents "Talking Startups With Michael Dell, founder of Dell Inc."

When: 6-9 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17, doors open at 5:15 p.m.

Where: The Auditorium, Student Activities Center (SAC) at The University of Texas at Austin.

Background: Join the Cockrell School of Engineering's Professor of Innovation and Chair of Free Enterprise Dr. Bob Metcalfe as he interviews Michael Dell about his experiences with the early life of Dell Inc., as well as innovation within the technology industry. A question and answer session follows.

Student Organization Wins National, Regional Awards

Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, UT Chapter at SHPE National Conference.

Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, UT Chapter at SHPE National Conference.

The Cockrell School of Engineer's Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) student chapter attended the SHPE National Conference in Anaheim, Calif. Oct. 26-30, and was presented with numerous national and regional awards, including:

Faculty Awarded Grants to Develop Technologies that Improve Energy Storage on the Grid

Two research groups at The University of Texas at Austin have been awarded grants to develop technologies that could dramatically improve energy storage capacity on the electric grid.

The grants, which were awarded to scientists at the Center for Electromechanics (CEM) and the Center for Electrochemistry further solidify the university's standing as a leader in utility scale energy storage technology. The field has been transformed thanks to research breakthroughs led by university faculty who are internationally renowned in battery storage and fuel cell research, among other areas of expertise.

October 2011

Engineering Professor and Alumnus Receive ASCE's Most Prestigious Award

A professor at The University of Texas at Austin's Cockrell School of Engineering and a graduate of the school have been awarded the Norman Medal, the most prestigious award given by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).

Engineering Faculty Recognized by AIChE with Prestigious Teaching and Research Awards

Pictured left to right are: Brian Korgel, David Allen and Roger Bonnecaze.

Pictured left to right are: Brian Korgel, David Allen and Roger Bonnecaze.

Five engineering faculty members and a professor emeritus at The University of Texas at Austin were recognized with prestigious awards during the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) annual meeting this week in Minneapolis, Minn.

Evacuation Tracking System Developed by CSR Receives Major International Award

A mass evacuation tracking system developed after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita by researchers at the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin has won a major award from the International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM).

Professor Elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies

George Georgiou, a professor at The University of Texas at Austin whose technology developments in the engineering, medical, biochemical and cellular fields could help treat tens of thousands of patients with diseases such as cancer and osteoporosis, has been elected as a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM).

Christine Schmidt Recognized as ING Professor of Excellence

Christine Schmidt, professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, will be one of six featured professors presented with a commemorative gift from ING during an on-field presentation as the Longhorns host the Cowboys of Oklahoma State at Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium on Saturday October 15.

"ING is committed to recognizing and honoring excellence in education," said David Linney, executive vice president and head of Public Markets, ING. "The ING Professor of Excellence Award is just one of the ways we can express our appreciation for educators who are dedicated to helping students reach their full potential, preparing them to compete in the global society."

Schmidt is a leader in the field of nerve regeneration and is forging a path to revolutionize treatment for spinal cord injuries. Her research has already had a major clinical impact for cancer patients, car accident victims and injured soldiers. She is also a winner of the Outstanding Engineering Teaching Award.

Dr. Lydia Contreras-Martin Selected to attend Frontiers of Engineering Education Symposium

Lydia Contreras-Martin, an assistant professor in the Chemical Engineering Department at The University of Texas at Austin, has been selected as one of 65 of the nation's most innovative, young engineering educators to participate in the National Academy of Engineering's (NAE) third Frontiers of Engineering Education Symposium. 

Faculty Awarded Grants to Develop Technologies that Improve Energy Storage on the Grid

Two research groups at The University of Texas at Austin have been awarded grants to develop technologies that could dramatically improve energy storage capacity on the electric grid.

The grants, which were awarded to scientists at the Center for Electrochemistry and the Center for Electromechanics (CEM), further solidify the university’s standing as a leader in utility scale energy storage technology.

September 2011

Competitive Scholars Program Addressing Grand Challenges of the 21st Century Available to Students

A unique scholars program for University of Texas at Austin students from all years and disciplines is offering the chance to tackle the world’s most pressing societal issues.

The Longhorn Grand Challenges Scholars Program (Longhorn GCSP) debuted this semester and is the first of its kind in Texas and among a handful of similar programs in the nation. Longhorn GCSP puts hope into action by combining expertise in engineering, business, law, policy and the humanities to address global challenges of the 21st century.