Visual Guidelines

These guidelines have been created to assist all of our engineering departments and programs in producing materials that are consistent and immediately recognizable as the Cockrell School of Engineering at the The University of Texas at Austin. Any item that represents the Cockrell School, its departments or its programs should follow these guidelines to ensure a unified message and professional image.

For questions about the Cockrell School identity and usage, please contact Cockrell School Communications at comm@engr.utexas.edu.


Logos | Fonts | Colors


School Identities

Please reference the Cockrell School's Brand Standards Manual when using the identities below.

FORMAL

The Formal Signature below is the primary identity for the Cockrell School and is to be used most often.

 

UT Austin Cockrell School of Engineering logo

 

Download all Formal Signature files

 

INFORMAL BRANDED

The Informal Branded Signature is the secondary identity for the Cockrell School and is to be used for specific purposes and materials. It includes two parts: "Texas Engineering" and a variation of the Formal Signature. When using the Informal Branded Signature, both parts must be used within the same piece but never stacked together.

 

UT Austin Cockrell School of Engineering logo

+

UT Austin Cockrell School of Engineering logo

 

Download all Informal Branded Signature files

 


Logo Requests

If you are not affiliated with the Cockrell School or UT Austin and would like to request to use the logos, please contact Cockrell School Communications at comm@engr.utexas.edu.

If you are a student organization interested in using the UT Austin or Cockrell School logos, contact Justin Brady-Joyner, Director of Engineering Student Life.

If you are creating a promotional item, you must have the item approved through Trademark Licensing.


Fonts and Uses

The Cockrell School of Engineering follows The University of Texas at Austin's font recommendations.

For Print Publications: Benton Sans/Benton Sans Condensed is the primary font. GT Sectra is a secondary font. Both typefaces are available worldwide in PC and Apple formats.

For Web/Digital Environments: Open Sans is the primary font selected for navigation, sub navigation, headlines and subheadlines. This font is web-friendly and replaces Benton Sans in a web/digital environment.


Colors

The Cockrell School of Engineering follows The University of Texas at Austin's official color palette.

Primary Palette

PANTONE: 159 | CMYK: 0, 65, 100, 9 | RGB: 191, 87, 0 | HEX: #BF5700
Pantone color 159, burnt orange

Burnt orange and white are the official colors and the primary palette we use to represent The University of Texas at Austin. The distinctive burnt orange color plays a major role in establishing our identity and should be implemented consistently in all web applications and print communications such as business cards, letterhead and presentations, as well as a broad range of marketing materials.

While burnt orange and white are the university's primary colors and an integral part of our brand, a secondary color palette has been developed to provide versatility and variety when developing communications materials for university programs.

Secondary Palette

PANTONE: 7469 | CMYK: 94, 59, 30, 10 | RGB: 0, 94, 131 | HEX: #005E83 
Pantone color 7469, blue

PANTONE: 5545 | CMYK: 62, 19, 45, 50 | RGB: 67, 105, 91 | HEX: #43695B
Pantone color 5545, green

PANTONE: 130 | CMYK: 0, 30, 100, 5 | RGB: 242, 169, 0 | HEX: #F2A900
Pantone color 130, yellow

PANTONE: 432 | CMYK: 65, 43, 26, 78 | RGB: 51, 63, 72 | HEX: #333F48
Pantone color 432, grey

PANTONE: 412 | CMYK: 52, 59, 45, 90 | RGB: 56, 47, 45 | HEX: #382F2D
Pantone color 412, brown

PANTONE: 7527 | CMYK: 3, 4, 14, 8 | RGB: 214, 210, 196 | HEX: #D6D2C4
Pantone color 7527, taupe

Keep the following guidelines in mind when using the secondary color palette:

  • Limit the number of secondary colors used in a single piece so they do not create an environment where UT is not recognizable.
  • Avoid color combinations of black and orange.
  • Where appropriate, tie secondary colors to the subject. Support colors can help connect the visual design to the subject of your piece. For example, a brochure related to environmental issues could use green or a poster focused on water sustainability could use blue.