Graduates Linked with Undergraduates in Engineering (GLUE)

The WEP GLUE program offers opportunities for engineering graduate students to mentor undergraduate engineering students in a unique, introductory, practical research experience. The program is one-semester long and is offered in the fall and spring semesters.

Participation is limited to about 24 undergraduates and is open to all degree-seeking engineering students in all majors who have never done research. Undergraduate participants gain valuable experience working with a graduate mentor on a research project for five hours per week and participating in a weekly seminar class meeting Tuesdays, 3:30-5 p.m. The duration of the program is one semester only.

Undergraduate Application Guidelines

Successful undergraduate applicants should:

  • have no prior research experience
  • attend an information session
  • be a second- or third-year, degree-seeking engineering student
  • have completed or be in the process of completing introductory engineering, physics, chemistry and math courses
  • have at least a 2.75 GPA at UT Austin
  • have a flexible course schedule in the semester of participation
  • complete one full semester of engineering at UT Austin, if a transfer student

GLUE is a very selective program, targeting second-year undergraduate women students, with the goal of increasing the number of women who pursue graduate study and academic careers in engineering. Selected students are high-achieving, very motivated to have an undergraduate research experience and have excellent GPAs. Selected participants are notified mid-semester prior to the following semester course registration period. Graduate and undergraduate matching information, as well as additional logistical information, is provided before the end of the semester prior to the following semester.

Graduate Student Mentors

Graduate student mentors participating in the program are able to help undergraduates learn about the research process, discuss and showcase what it's like to be in graduate school, gain valuable mentoring and teaching experience and participate in targeted career development workshops. This is a unique, valuable experience that can be a great addition for your resume. First-year grad students are encouraged to wait one year before participating, since a defined and active research project is most beneficial in the program. Ph.D. students in the final phases of their dissertation may have difficulty having well-defined research to provide to the undergraduate student.

Mentors should:

  • be willing to work with their undergraduate mentee for about five hours per week
  • meet weekly with their mentee to direct the research
  • include the mentee in research meetings, seminars, etc. when appropriate and available
  • introduce the mentee to other graduate students and their faculty mentor
  • have an organized, defined research topic to give to the mentee to work on during the semester; this can be a small part of your research or a replication of some work already completed
  • assist the mentee with the development of their research poster and presentations
  • be supportive of WEP's mission to encourage more women to enter graduate school or an academic career